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(Image stolen from the Newman Lab at MIT)

5 years ago today, I posted my first entry on Klaustoon’s Blog. Actually, the blog itself had been active since the day before (March 9, 2009), thanks to Dan Cashen, who made up for my lack of digital skills and designed the blog himself. The cartoon I chose to start the blog with featured a comment on the preeminent presence of the architecture department on anything GSD-related, drawn on occasion of the publication of the first installment of GSD Platform. As some others that were featured afterwards, it had previously appeared on Trays, the late GSD online journal directed by Quilian Riano et al. After all, the point of these cartoons was to make tongue-in-cheek, in-house satire of everything that happened within the realms of GSD life. The blog was meant to be a mere spin-off where I could show some other non-GSD related -or less PC- stuff. As you see, everything was really low-profile.

That April, however, our friend Rem came over for his hilarious intervention in the Ecological Urbanism Conference, which obviously deserved some comment, and some days later, Kazys Varnelis deemed it interesting enough to illustrate his blog. So, surprised by this kind of attention, I decided to make a test: I took a cartoon I had started with a different protagonist, and reworked it into “On Starchitecture”. The cartoon started popping up everywhere on the internet and beyond (it still does), and that was that.

So, let me do some recap of what’s happened in these five years.

Since I opened the blog, most of its cartoons have been published here and there. A tip of the hat must go to Kazys Varnelis and Joseph Grima, who recruited me as the editorial cartoonist for The New City Reader (NY New Museum, 2010-11), and to Carlo Aiello, who was the first to commission a cartoon from me, for eVolo magazine. After that, they have been featured in Harvard Design Magazine, Clog (also here), Puerto Rico University’s (In)Forma, Milan-based Studio, Norwegian mag Conditions, the Russian Project International, Volume, the book Goodbye Topolinia and, of course, MAS context (here, too). I also have to thank the effort invested by many people to exhibit my work, starting with the retrospective organized in 2010 by the Society of Architects of South Portugal, the inclusion of my cartoons in the Celebration of the 75th Anniversary of the GSD, the mini-show within Jimenez Lai’s “Three Little Worlds” installation in the Architecture Foundation, MAS Context’s Analog Show in Chicago (again with Jimenez), or the “Klaus Korner” at the Building Comics exhibit in the 2013 Naples ComiCon. Next show, it seems, will take place in a city well known for its particular ‘effect’.

The most surprising aspect of all this is, however, its academic side-effect, which has taken me to speak to London, Barcelona (more here), or Naples, and to write articles for Clog, Conditions, Studio, MAS Context, to be interviewed for Volume (Jimenez, even once more, this time together with Brendan Cormier), and Mas Context   (there’s one more yet to be published) or even to work as a guest editor (happy 5th anniversary to you too, Iker). What a waste of time, those years spent on a PhD…

2013 marked my first ongoing collaboration with a magazine, the “Klaus’ Kube” section at Uncube (thanks, Jessica, Florian, Sophie), which will soon be joined by another one. Starting with the March 2014 issue, Mexican magazine Arquine will feature “Arquinoir”, where you will be able to behold -yet once more- my lack of ability in imitating André Franquin. There’s some more thrilling stuff bound to happen, but I’d rather not unveil it yet. Stay tuned.

So, thank you all for watching. See you here in 5 more years’ time.

NK 12 sm

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They’ve built schools like wedding cakes and are making a real-life gingerbread house with Grayson Perry. But the UK’s most playful practice is breaking up after 23 years. They have built a romanesque church out of sparkly blue sequins, a school that looks like a gothic wedding cake and turned the head of Hercules into a squishy seat. Now, in an unexpected twist, the mischievous London architecture practice FAT has announced it will be no more. Architects usually die, divorce, or go bust – so why the boyband-style break-up?

“We all feel we’ve completed what we set out to do,” says Sam Jacob, who has worked with fellow partners Sean Griffiths and Charles Holland for the last 23 years on everything from art installations to social housing, alongside a prolific volume of writing and teaching. “FAT was only ever intended to be a project, a way of taking a set of ideas out into the world,” he says. “We still can’t believe we’ve had so many opportunities to make buildings.” [...]

The three partners have yet to announce their future plans, but will end their collaboration at the Venice Architecture Biennale next summer, where they are curating the British Pavilion with Dutch practice Crimson and writer Owen Hatherley.

“They remain open to offers for a lucrative reunion in 20 years’ time,” concludes the official press release. “We’ve got to go on a victory tour,” grins Jacob. “Bands used to take 30 years to reunite, but nowadays they’re back together in a couple of months, so who knows …”

– Oliver Wainwright: The end of FAT: architecture’s biggest pranksters call it quits – boyband style.” The Guardian, Tuesday 17 December 2013

……………………………………………………

The original cartoon can be found as originally published in the “Klaus Kube” section of Uncube Magazine #18: Slovenia, edited by Sophie Lovell, Florian Heilmeyer, Jessica Bridger, Elvia Wilk et al. And yes, that is Foster’s “Cycling Utopia” (for God’s sake…) in the foreground.

A tip of the hat to Sam Jacob and the rest of FAT. I’m really sorry to see them disbanding, but I’m also looking forward to seeing what comes out of this in the future. Best of lucks!

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Last, but not least on the list (too much, huh?) of interesting stuff I was somehow involved in busy 2013 was being featured in “Goodbye Topolinia” [Malcor D'Edizioni, 2013], a book on comics and architecture written by Laura Cassará and Sebastiano D’Urso. As Laura defines it, “the book is an essay, written side by side, on the mutual interferences between architecture and comics. It is not an encyclopedic compilation, in the sense that we had no intention to analyze all the episodes of the intersections between both disciplines. We were primarily interested in tracing the conceptual threads that make it possible to outline analogies between both artforms throughout their History. Obviously, the theoretical discourse was seasoned with countless examples, both of architectural and comic-book work, typically -but not only- in those cases where both categories converge in a narrative pertaining to one discipline or to the other.” [Excerpted and -freely- translated from a conversation between Andrea Alberghini and Laura Cassará in "Welcome 'Goodbye Topolinia'". Comics Metropolis, October 8 2013]

The book, which can be purchased online in different sites, for those not living in Italy, is certainly rich in examples, including most of the authors featured in our own MAS Context: Narrative, such as Chris Ware, Wes JonesTom Kaczynski, Jimenez Lai, Marc-Antoine Mathieu, François Schuiten, or Joost Swarte. On top of it, as the icing on the cake, the book opens with an introduction by Benoît Peeters, the other half in Schuiten and Peeters’ nearly mythical “Les Cités Obscures”. I suspect my inclusion in the book stems mainly from my presence at the 2013 Comicon in Naples, which makes me doubly indebted for the invitation. As usual, a big thank you to Laura, and Sebastiano for their interest [and an eventual follow-up this year. We'll keep informing]. Below, you can check some pages from the book, and a short excerpt of the Klaus-related parts provided by Ms. Cassará herself.  For more information, provided you can read Italian, I would check the review of the book at Fumettologica.

And next week, back to cartoons.

Goodbye Topolinia 01

Goodbye Topolinia 02

“Comics relate to architecture also by means of irony and satire: so does Klaus, an architect who also draws comics. He treats serious issues posed by contemporary architectue with a light-hearted mood, and his drawings, while resembling cutting edge architectural projects, really call into question contemporary architectural statements. And so the competition for the Twin Towers reconstruction, after 9/11 attacks, is the chance to make fun of the entries submitted by archistars for the international invite-only contest. His analysis goes further, in search for similarities between archistars’ projects and cartoonists’ drawings, with quite a remarkable finding: in his own blog, he compares the House of Music in Porto, designed by Rem Koolhaas in 1995-2001, to the Metabunker megastructure, as conceived by Gimenez and Jodorowsky in 1992. The remarkable resemblance doesn’t mean Koolhaas project is not authentic; instead, it’s a proof that, using their imagination and creativity, comics creators are often forerunners of future architectural forms.”

Goodbye Topolinia 05 Goodbye Topolinia 06 Goodbye Topolinia 03 Goodbye Topolinia 04

Klaus 01 copyOriginal photograph from The Cartoonist Project,

copyright Simone Florena

One of the highlights of 2013 -which has certainly been the busiest year in terms of Klaus-related events so far- was the unexpected invitation to participate in the 2013 Comicon in Naples, in late April. created in 1998, the Naples Comicon has evolved from a rather domestic celebration of comics culture into an event of Biblical proportions with concerts, hundreds of vendors, exhibitions, international artists, and hundreds of thousands of accumulated visitors (60,000 only in the 2013 event).

Since its third edition, in 2001, the Comicon also displayed a central theme that ran through the exhibitions, conferences  and guest artists. First, it dealt with comic book culture as developed in/by certain countries (the 2001 edition focused on Spain and Latin America). In 2007, the central theme changed to the more abstract field of color (starting with cyan, and ending with black in 2010), and in 2011 it moved towards the interactions between comics and the higher arts: Music (2011), Literature (2012), and, after being delayed for a couple of years, Architecture in 2013 (the 2014 Comicon will be focused on comics and cinema). Within this context, it’s difficult to start to explain how excited I was when Andrea Alberghini (author of the book Sequenze Urbane: la Metropoli nell Fumetto), who worked as a consultant in architectural-related issues for the organization, contacted me asking if I wanted to participate.

Other than giving me the chance to finally visit Pompei, the Comicon also presented the rather surreal opportunity to be sitting in a panel, “Building Comics”, along with two living legends I often write about, such as Joost Swarte and François Schuiten. The fact that both of them had a great role in shaping my interests in architecture just adds to the ‘over-the-top-ness’ of the experience.  Adding to this, a second panel, “Fumett(archi)tettando”, gave me the opportunity to rejoin Swarte, and meet architect-comic book artist Manuele Fior. The effects of all this can be seen in the special issue MAS Context: Narrative I was coediting at the time, which was already in the works, but certainly took a new turn after this (check the interview Swarte’s Mystery Theater’, ‘Images Come First’, a conversation between Andrea Alberghini and Manuele Fior, or Melanie Van der Hoorn’sSensing the Comics’ DNA: A Conversation with François Schuiten’).

01The Klaus Korner. Photograph by Cristina Cusani via Comics metropolis.

02_Building_Comics_IntroThe Klaus Korner. Photograph by Cristina Cusani via Comics metropolis.

02_Building_Comics_IntroSome of the works exhibited in the ‘Building Comics’ area. Photograph by Cristina Cusani via Comics metropolis.

Also, I have to thank Alino, Claudio Curcio and the rest of the organization for building an area dedicated to my work within the big exhibition “Building Comics”, where I was in the company of original artwork by Winsor McCay, François Schuiten, Joost Swarte, George McManus, Chris Ware, or George Herrimann. An experience both flattering and embarrassing. Thanks!

More info on the Naples Comicon, both past and present, on their website (in Italian).

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So, before January is over, I’d like to post the first one in a series of posts that look back at some of the stuff that happened in 2013 but which, due to the hectic-ness of these last months, had to wait till now. So, as a starting point, I thought it would be nice to celebrate the imminent -and eminent- first anniversary of my ongoing collaboration with Uncube Magazine, a Berlin-based, online journal that has managed to make its own place in the netsphere through a steady flow of thematic, monthly issues, since August 2012.

Drifting a little from my usually elusive manners, I offered them to draw an egotistic strip, “Numerus Klausus”, commenting on current issues on and around architecture in my own section within the magazine, ‘Klaus’ Kube’. Of course, even though it started as a regular-looking comic strip, they soon talked me into doing something a little more complex -they didn’t have to try too hard. Some of the strips are still pretty elusive, but at least this time their backstory is easier to trace back. Also, the editors’ suggestions gave me the opportunity to feature a lot of guest stars, such as the inevitable Rem-the-Man, but also MVRDV, Rafael Viñoly, Renzo Piano, Kieran Long, Pink Floyd (seriously), Florian Heilmeyer, Sophie Lovell, Zaha Hadid, Gregg Lynn, sylvia Lavin, Jean Nouvel or Sigmund Freud.

Scroll down for the whole series (including two non-posted ones)

Klaus's Kube 01 Delusional EconomiesI. Delusional Economies, in Uncube’s blogklaus Kube 02 You're so Kool blogII. You’re so Kool in Uncube Magazine # 07 : Off-places.

NK 03 On Intellectuality blogIII. On Intellectuality in Uncube Magazine #9: Constructing Images

NK 04 Taylorist Designs 01 blogIV. Tayloredist Designs in Uncube Magazine #9: Constructing Images

MVRDV Cloud EncountersV. Cloud Encounters of the 911th Kind in Uncube issue #10: Wood, Paper Pulp

NK06 - DEF 03 smVI. Metropol Para-Poli in Uncube Magazine #11: Charles CorreaUncube Numerus Klausus 07  Architecture Mon AmourVII. Architecture, Mon Amour in Uncube Magazine #12: Into the Desert NK08 02 xsmVIII. One of my Turns in Uncube Magazine #13: BerlinNK09 Viñoly attacks uncube 03IX. Faulty Towers in Uncube Magazine #15: Small Towns, Big ArchitectureShardnadoX. Shardnado! in Uncube Magazine #14: Veins

NK 11 01 smXI. Form Follows Friction in Uncube #17: Construct Africa

This last one came after a suggestion (as another one preceding it and yet one more to come) by Sophie Lovell, who thought it would be better not to have me making humor of anything Africa-related, and asked me to tackle on Zaha Hadid’s vagina-like stadium instead. I have to say that, were I an editor, the prospect of myself being given free reign to draw vaginas in the magazine wouldn’t make me any less worried, anyhoo… so, consequently, I took the opportunity to throw in some of all this phallic proliferation that’s been happening lately in architecture, ranging from Jean Nouvel’s dildo to Foster’s recently-flaccid Gherkin, China’s People’s Daily Newspaper circumcised HQ, or that infamous church that looks like a penis in aerial view (if you’re interested in this highly intellectual topic, check Cabinet Magazine’s 2003 Competition for the Most Phallic Building in the World). It also gave me the chance to feature Gregg Lynn and Sylvia Lavin (not her first time in the blog), who’s the subject of a cartoon I never get to sit and draw. Over there, writing on his blog in Providence, David Brussat identified this as an ITD (Internet transmitted Disease): “Klaustoon on Koolhaas and Penises” at Architecture Here and There.

Next issue, it  will be FAT time.

ShardnadoClick to enlarge

“Why is it the tallest? I don’t really remember. I don’t really care. It was actually taller at the beginning, it was 400 meters, but then aeronautics came and they said that you can not because you interfere with the flight of the air planes. So we broke it. The building is now 310 meters but it is still designed to go up to 400 meters. Many people still believe it is unfinished… this idea is part of the game in some way,” says Piano in the 20 minute interview.

 “As an architect you have a very dangerous job to perform. Dangerous for you but even more dangerous for other people. Because if you do something wrong it is forever. I think it [The Shard] is fine. I stopped crossing my fingers only a few months ago. You do everything you can to make it right but the truth is that you only understand at the end when it is built if it is right or wrong. I was not very good at school. I grew up with the idea that what you do is fine but it is probably not good enough. And so even now at 75 I still feel that every time I do something right it is a miracle. I don’t live in the sensation that everything I do is right. It is always a great surprise.”

Responding to criticisms that The Shard is a symbol of the welath dividie in London, Piano says that only 50 or 60 of the 10,000 people that will visit The Shard every day could be classified as rich. But he agrees that £25 is too much to charge to access the viewing platform at the top of the building.  “£25 is too much but in this town everything costs too much… I agree it is too expensive. Because one of the aims of this building is to give London back to the people and to be public. But this is the normal price. If you go to the top of the Empire State building you spend more than that.”

Er, Renzo, let me remind you. It’s that tall because you all wanted to make A SHITLOAD OF MONEY.

22 Feb

And, by the way, a ticket to the top of the Empire State building is $25/£16 which is a lot cheaper than going to the top of the Shard.

……………………………..

Nuff Said.

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So… finally! After more than a year in the works, the 20th issue of MAS Context, a special issue under the motto “Narrative”, is out. Talks about this issue started on October 2012, amidst the MAS Context: Analog event in Chicago that also featured the “Architectural Narratives” exhibition, originally intended to be called “Building Stories”, after Chris Ware’s eponymous magna opus –that is, until we found that Mr. Ware was opening an exhibition himself in the same city, on the same dates, and under the same title! In any case, the exhibition, which featured some works by Jimenez Lai and yours truly was accompanied by a text, also entitled “Architectural Narratives”, which dealt with the varying relationships that architecture and graphic narratives have maintained throughout the years. Happy with our previous collaborations in Ownership and Communication, Iker Gil, chief editor of MAS Context, suggested the possibility of expanding it into a whole issue of the magazine, and, after some hesitation (a whole two minutes), the ball was set rolling.

MAS_Context_Issue20_v 00 2As the editor’s note points out (and I’m not going to put it in between quotation marks because I wrote it myself), Architecture and narrative, as Victor Hugo nostalgically pointed out, have walked hand in hand through history, crossing paths without really risking the extinction that the archdeacon of Notre-Dame gloomily predicted. Moreover, today, in a moment where the conjunction of the crisis and the entrance into a new stage in the communication era impulse the discipline into new, multiple directions, the narrative aspects of architecture come to the front, and comics are not alien to this. The last few years have seen an increasing enthusiasm within architecture on the possibilities of graphic narrative, both from a historical point of view, with a blossoming of either academic or informal studies on the exchanges between both disciplines, and from architectural practitioners. Even in a moment of digital explosion such as the one we are living, comics and graphic narrative are the new ‘cool’ in architectural schools (sorry), making it into architectural design courses, and showing up as a new fashion in architectural representation/communication. There we have, most notoriously, starchitecture’s enfant terrible Bjarke Ingels and his excessive (but still pretty well crafted) Yes Is More, which we discussed some time ago, but also Herzog&De Meuron’s MetroBasel, Wes Jones’ Beyond Dubai, Jean Nouvel’s Louisiana Manifesto, Neutelings&Robdeen’ European Patent Office at Leidschendam, Olivier Kugler & Fletcher Priest’s Freethinking, and a long etcetera. Even more interesting are those instances where the comic book form is used as a parallel research environment, prominently presented in the work of Jimenez Lai in Bureau Spectacular, but also by Studio CEBRA’s toons, or Leopold Lambert’s Lost in the Line.

MAS_Context_Issue20_v 00 3Thus, MAS Context: Narrative(s) was set to offer just a glimpse of the phenomenon with no aim to exhaust the topic—even if some of the authors of the essays have built some rather encyclopedic works on it themselves- but wanting to offer a taste of the different faces that this interaction between architecture and graphic narrative presents. Within its overall theme, NARRATIVE tries to explore this issue from both sides of the of the line that separates these two disciplines, and is roughly divided into three big sections: the first one deals with the presence of graphic narrative in disciplinary architecture, both past and present, and includes the works of some architects who have used graphic narrative in their work, in one way or another. The other side would be covered, in the second section, by those comic book artists who have also crossed the border between disciplines, making forays into the built world. Finally, the third one, an addendum entitled in our drafts “Beyond the (Comic) page”, moves conceptually towards both sides of the spectrum, briefly covering the tangents with (implied) written narratives and emerging animation practices in architecture.

MAS_Context_Issue20_v 22Factory Fifteen

We have been so lucky as to being able to feature an impressive team of contributors, which includes legendary names both from the comic book and the architectural field, who have contributed with their works and their words: Originally entitled Narrative(s) or Narratives (although finally simplified for the sake of clarity) the issue features a combination of essays and, primarily, interviews, where these creators explain their works in their own words, therefore providing the readers with different narratives on the issue of (graphic) narrative. Thus, illustrating the role of comic book artists as architectural performers, we are proud to include interviews with comic legends François Schuiten, acclaimed author of the series Les Cités Obscures (along with co-writer Benoît Peeters), Joost Swarte, Dutch creator of the ligne claire (also in a literal sense), Marc-Antoine Mathieu, author the of mesmerizing series Julius Corentin Acquefacques, and two architects who crossed to the other side and stayed there: Italian architect-turned-comic book artist Manuele Fior, and Tom Kaczynski, artist and chief editor of independent publishing house Uncivilized Books.

MAS_Context_Issue20_v 09

François Schuiten

MAS_Context_Issue20_v 10

Joost Swarte

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Marc-Antoine Mathieu

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Manuele Fior

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Tom Kaczynski

On the other side of the spectrum, the magazine features an interview with Sir Peter Cook, who graciously answered our questions in his London office, on the making of ‘Amazing Archigram 4′ (the Zoom issue), as well as three stories by Wes Jones&Partners, Jimenez Lai, and Léopold Lambert (aka The Funambulist). And, in its last part, the issue closes with a conversation with Jonathan Gales, who sheds some light on the work of London-based office Factory Fifteen. Many thanks to all of them for their kindly collaboration, and also to the conductors of the interviews: Clara Olóriz, from the AA, who also made all arrangements to meet Mr. Cook, Léopold Lambert, who provided his knowledge of Borges, Kafka, and the French language, in the interview with Mr. Mathieu, Andrea Alberghini, author of Sequenze Urbane, La Metropoli nell Fumetto, who contributed his mastering of Italian and of Manuele Fior’s work, and both members of Barcelona-based publishing House DPR, Ethel Baraona Pohl, and Cesar Reyes Nájera, who took some time off their extremely busy schedule to interview the equally busy members of Factory Fifteen. A very special thanks must go to cultural anthropologist Mélanie van der Hoorn, author of the monumental “Bricks and Balloons – Architecture in Comic Strip Form”, who shared with us her extensive research in the form of not just one, but three articles. Last, but not least, we have to thank Chris Ware for putting the icing on the cake by sending us a drawing from his seminal Building Stories for the cover of the issue, masterfully designed by Renata Graw, from Plural -thus replacing my own rather banal design, which you can enjoy (irony, yes) below.

MAS_Context_Issue20_v 01Peter Cook

MAS_Context_Issue20_v 05Jimenez Lai

MAS_Context_Issue20_v 03Léopold Lambert

MAS_Context_Issue20_v 06

Jones and Partners

MAS_Context_Issue20_v 07Author Unknown

Also below you can check the table of contents of the issue, which are fully accessible via MAS Context’s Page, or downloadable in .pdf. Also, MAS Context will be printing a limited edition of the magazine, so if you want a hard copy of it, you’d better be fast in contacting them.

1. Introduction: Architectural Narratives. Issue statement by Iker Gil,editor in chief of MAS Context.

2. Building Stories: Drawings by Chris Ware. Text by Klaus.

3. Comics and Architecture, Comics in Architecture. Essay by Koldo Lus Arana.

4. Buildings and Their Representations Collapsing Upon One Another. Architecture in comic strip form. Essay by Mélanie van der Hoorn.

5. Amazing Archigram! Clara Olóriz and Koldo Lus Arana interview architect Sir Peter Cook.

6. Lost in the Line. Graphic Novel by Léopold Lambert.

7. Out of Water. Graphic Novel by Jimenez Lai.

8. Kartun: The View! Graphic Novel by Jones, Partners: Architecture, Mark Simmons, and The Southern California Institute of Architecture.

9. Cartooning Architecture and Other Issues. Iker Gil interviews graphic artist Klaus.

10. Starchitecture Redux. Cartoons by Klaus.

11. Sensing the Comic’s DNA: Excerpts of a conversation with François Schuiten. Mélanie van der Hoorn in conversation with François Schuiten.

12. Swarte’s Mystery Theater. Koldo Lus Arana in conversation with Joost Swarte.

13. Labyrinths and Metaphysical Constructions: An Interview with Marc-Antonie Mathieu. Léopold Lambert interviews graphic novelist Marc-Antoine Mathieu.

14. Images Come First. Andrea Alberghini interviews Manuele Fior.

15. Beta Testing Architecture: Yearning for Space with Tom Kaczynski. Koldo Lus Arana interviews Tom Kaczynski.

16. Archiporn or Storylines? Creative Architectural commercials as challenges to the communication and marketing of architecture. Essay by Mélanie van der Hoorn.

17. Beyond Built Architecture. Ethel Baraona Pohl and César Reyes from dpr-barcelona interview Jonathan Gales, founding member of Factory Fifteen.

MAS Context: Narrative, Winter 2013, with contributions by Andrea Alberghini, Ethel Baraona Pohl, Sir Peter Cook, Manuele Fior, Factory Fifteen, Iker Gil, Jones, Partners: Architecture, Tom Kaczynski, Jimenez Lai, Klaus, Léopold Lambert, Luis Miguel (Koldo) Lus Arana, Marc-Antoine Mathieu, Clara Olóriz Sanjuán, Cesar Reyes Nájera, François Schuiten, Joost Swarte, Mélanie van der Hoorn, and Chris Ware.

Edited by Iker Gil (Chief editor). Guest editors: Luis Miguel (Koldo) Lus Arana, Klaus.

Cover 02 sm 01

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