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Joseph Grima

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Cartoon for The New City Reader: Classifieds, guest-edited by Leagues and Legions and drawn quite in a rush, which explains the lack of shadowing. It will get done at some point (hopefully). Click on the images below to read the full issue, which also features a couple of other cartoons by Brady Dale and the inimitable Jimenez Lai, from Bureau Spectacular, or navigate through the assembled version on the New City Reader’s blog.

Update: As of 1.10.2011 it´s also downloadable from DSGN AGNC, thanks to Quilian Riano.


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The New City Reader: A Newspaper of Public Space is a project curated by Kazys Varnelis and Joseph Grima. The New City Reader is a performance-based editorial residency designed as a part of the Last Newspaper, an exhibit running at New York’s New Museum from 6 October 2010‒9 January 2011. It consists of one edition, published over the course of the project, with a new section produced weekly by alternating guest editorial teams within the museum’s gallery space. These sections are  available free every Friday at the New Museum and will also be posted in public throughout the city for collective reading. The permanent staff and list of guest editorial teams can be found in Varnelis.net.

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Cartoon for The New City Reader: Weather Section, a continuous 3-spread graphic that includes a large city expanse with magnified close-ups pertaining building materials/architectural objects and their relation to weather. The weather section has been guest-edited by Jeffrey Inaba/ C-LAB, and put together with the collaboration of  Justin Fowler, Simon Battisti, Nathalie Janson, Amanda Shi, Lauren Turner, Jeffrey Yip, Neeraj Bhatia, Charles Holland, Rory Hyde, Wes Jones, Sean Lally, Andy Lantz, Jürgen Mayer H., Markus, Miessen, Nicholas de Monchaux (http://nicholas.demonchaux.com/),  Philippe Rahm, and Dong-Ping Wong.

You can read it by clicking on the images below:

Or download the full pdf at C-Lab’s Weather Patterns.

Also, inside this issue you’ll find the Obituaries Section, guest edited by MOS (yes, these guys).



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The New City Reader: A Newspaper of Public Space is a project curated by Kazys Varnelis and Joseph Grima. The New City Reader is a performance-based editorial residency designed as a part of the Last Newspaper, an exhibit running at New York’s New Museum from 6 October 2010‒9 January 2011. It consists of one edition, published over the course of the project, with a new section produced weekly by alternating guest editorial teams within the museum’s gallery space. These sections are  available free every Friday at the New Museum and will also be posted in public throughout the city for collective reading. The permanent staff and list of guest editorial teams can be found in Varnelis.net.

Click to enlarge

Subject: sex!
From: Kazys Varnelis
To: Klaus
Cc: Robert Sumrell

any chance you’d like to do some kind of terrifying orgy cartoon for our essay?

a tangle of bodies, a la hieronymous bosch meets the mitchell brothers?

i’m terrified… i’m sure you are too.

robert will elaborate.

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Subject: Re: sex!
From: Robert Sumrell
To: Kazys Varnelis
Cc: Klaus

I think it should be an orgy in the graves design section of wallmart

Sent from a tin can and piece of string

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Subject: Re: sex!
From: Robert Sumrell
To: Kazys Varnelis
Cc: Klaus

There is actually a pretty well know editorial cartoon of a bourgeois couple looking at a William Morris Teapot thinking “how can we ever live up to this”
Maybe this one could be a couple with a normal teapot looking at the Michael Graves or Martha Stewart Orgy thinking “They’ll never sleep with us, look at our teapot”
It would make sense with the content of the article…
R

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Subject: Re: sex!
From: Kazys Varnelis
To: Robert Sumrell
Cc: Klaus

Perfect.

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Subject: This is the cartoon
From: Robert Sumrell
To: Kazys Varnelis
Cc: Klaus


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Subject: Re: This is the Cartoon
From: Kazys Varnelis
To: Robert Sumrell
Cc: Klaus

Yes that is it. Perfect. except I think the couple should have the Michael Graves teapot. Could it be Brad and Angelina or some celebrities with design interest?

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Subject: Re: This is the Cartoon
From: Klaus
To: Kazys Varnelis
Cc: Robert Sumrell

Hey, guys,

Lacking some context here. Could anyone send me the article, or sth.?
I woke up this morning, read your emails and still have no idea what you’re speaking about!!!

Best,

K-

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Subject: Re: This is the cartoon
From: Kazys Varnelis
To: Klaus
Cc: Robert Sumrell

Oh yes! We (AUDC) are writing an essay on the history of the idea of lifestyle, for the style issue…

in the US, the term “the lifestyle” refers to swinging or group sex.

k.

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Subject: Re: This is the cartoon
From: Klaus
To: Kazys Varnelis
Cc: Robert Sumrell

So, in the article this would illustrate, there’s some commentary made of Michael Graves’s industrial design as compared to Martha Stewart?

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Subject: Re: This is the cartoon
From: Kazys Varnelis
To: Klaus
Cc: Robert Sumrell

There isn’t any particular commentary on them yet…

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Subject: Re: This is the cartoon
From: Klaus
To: Kazys Varnelis
Cc: Robert Sumrell

Well, I hope there’s some way to make the connection, or people will think I’m just going mental…

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Subject: Re: This is the cartoon
From: Robert Sumrell
To: Kazys Varnelis
Cc: Klaus

Hi Klaus,

We are writing an article for the style section about the development of the concept of lifestyle.

In short, the rise of commercial culture came with conflicting sentiments. The desire to emulate the luxury of previous eras, and the knowledge of the social repression and sexual deviance that they allowed.

The old cartoon epitomizes the relationship of an engaged couple hoping to show others the status they want to have through a teapot that will express them. In victorian times, the means of expression were reduced. Leisure activity was limited to religious and organized social outings. Tea was a safe way to interact with others and kept things from getting too sexy, which was a constant danger. The couple hopes the tea pot will complete them. It is ,after all a consumate object.

Moving forward and skipping a bit, with the rise of the internet came a new freedom in social interaction that coincided with women’s lib and equality. the early Well was rife with hook ups and dating offers. Singles bars came into being. The lifestyle developed as we had the peak moment of subculture. In the late 80’s material culture bloomed, sex hit a wall with aids. Subculture became marketed as Alternative and Alternative lifestyles became marketable Everything gained a place in marketing campaigns and that was the end of identity politics. With the internet and dot com booms modern lifestyle begins as do the creative industries. You define yourself as a story to be broadcast, complete with objects and clothing to match. Your image becomes as important or more important than your resume. The second cartoon would update the first. We expect others to judge us by how we present ourselves rather than by what we actually do (work is now completely abstracted to almost become unexplainable and no one produces anything). We go into huge amounts of debt to support this descriptive system. Not to sound too crude – but where the victorian couple was trying to maintain fidelity to an object we currently buy teapots so that we can enter into the orgy of consumption and find a place to belong with our peers…

I hope that helps.

R.

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The New City Reader: Music + Style. Edited by DJ Nron, DJ Rupture, Robert Sumrell and Andrea Ching. The New City Reader: A Newspaper of Public Space is a project created by  Kazys Varnelis, and  Joseph Grima. The New City Reader is a performance-based editorial residency designed as as part of the Last Newspaper, an exhibit running at New York’s New Museum from 6 October 2010‒9 January 2011. It will consist of one edition, published over the course of the project with a new section (Editorial, International News, Business/Economy, Politics…) produced weekly by alternating guest editorial teams within the museum’s gallery space. These sections will be available free at the New Museum and—in emulation of a practice common in the nineteenth-century American city and still popular in parts of the world today—will be posted in public throughout the city for collective reading.

Click to read

Cartoon for The New City Reader issue VII: Real State, with contributions by Peter Tolkin, Mabel O. Wilson, Carmen Argote, Chloë Bass, Brigette Borders, John Cantwell, Catherine Ingraham (not this topic, this time), Marisa Jahn/CUP, Olalekan Jeyifous, Alexandra Lange, Elizabeth Lasater, Zoe Malliaros, Mitch McEwen, Minna Ninova, Daniel Payne, Alan Rapp, Cassim Shepard and Matthew Vaz.

Available since November 19 at the New Museum. A peek at the cover and contents here.

Click to Read

Noone’s gonna get the cinephilic reference (otherwise, prove me wrong if you dare).

In any case, the Food Section of The New City Reader, curated by  William Prince, Krista Ninivaggi, and Nicola Twilley will “hit the stands” at the New Museum next Sunday. Be sure to get a free copy if you are in NY. Unless there have been last-minute changes, you’ll find four cartoons in it (Hence the overload of updates this week and the next one). Previous issues can be read here.

Click to Read


Next week’s section of The New City Reader revolves around food and (in) the city  This issue has been curated (actually, it’s still being produced as I write this) by William Prince & Krista Ninivaggi from Park, and Nicola Twilley, from Edible Geography and co-founder of the engaging Food Print Project.

The cartoons deal with the undergoing subtopic of overhearing and the relationships bred at the informal, unexpected gatherings in food places. Following a suggestion by Will Prince, Phillip Johnson -the habitual guest at Four Season’s table 32 in the Seagram Building- entered the game pretty soon (thanks, Will), but he revealed such a charismatic cartoon character that became a recurring theme himself. For further reading on Phillip Johnson and his relationship with the Four Seasons, you can check Terry Riley’s “Fifty Years of the Four Seasons” in Metropolis Magazine, and Steven Kurutz’s “With a Legend Gone, What Fate for Table 32” in The New York Times. Paul Goldberger also wrote a nice recount of Phillip Johnson’s career after his death for TNY that can be found here.

More cartoons for this issue to follow this week and the next one. The Food section will be available for free pickup at The New Museum next Friday (November 19). You can read all the issues of The New City Reader online in The New City Reader Blog.

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The New City Reader: A Newspaper of Public Space is a project curated by Kazys Varnelis and Joseph Grima. The New City Reader is a performance-based editorial residency designed as a part of the Last Newspaper, an exhibit running at New York’s New Museum from 6 October 2010‒9 January 2011. It consists of one edition, published over the course of the project, with a new section produced weekly by alternating guest editorial teams within the museum’s gallery space. These sections are  available free every Friday at the New Museum and will also be posted in public throughout the city for collective reading. The permanent staff and list of guest editorial teams can be found in Varnelis.net.

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