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Violeau - Rem, Le Bon, la Brute

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Les Éditions B2 is an indie publisher based in Paris, specialized in the publication of short -and not that short- texts that engage architecture from a variety of peripheral viewpoints. In their own words:

“Les collections B2 se proposent d’édifier un « cabinet de curiosités » architectural arpentant, dans le temps et dans l’espace, de Los Angeles à Vladivostok et de l’an mil à nos jours, une infinité d’espèces d’espaces et d’hétérotopies baroques… Embryonnaire, cette « Galaxie Gutenberg » s’organise principalement autour de plusieurs constellations – dont certaines n’existent pas encore…”

McLuhanisms aside, the different collections put together by Éditions B2: Actualités, Contre-Cultures, Design, Fac-Simile, Flashback, Patrimoine, Societé, Territoires… are -and I can testify this because I have 2 Kg. worth of their books sitting on my desk- a true culinary delicacy. Printed in small formats, those mini-books (hi, Tom Kaczynski), are a sort of delicatessen where the impatient reader can find a variety of texts by Paul Andreu et Nathalie Roseau, Beatriz Colomina, Claude Parent, Antoine Picon, Felicity Scott, Kim Jong-Il (no, I’m not kidding), Richard Buckminster Fuller, Louis XIV, Raymond Hood, my beloved Carol Willis, Louis Sullivan, and a neverending list of other authors.

Some months ago, Nikola Jankovic, chief editor of B2, informed me that a book by Jean-Louis Violeau dealing with Koolhaas was in the works, and asked me if I would be ok if they produced a booklet with all the “Hope” cartoons inside… adding to some other provocation. My curiosity piqued, I couldn’t but say “go with it”, and this was the outcome.

 Violeau - Rem, Le Bon, la Brute 02

I’m so slow updating the blog that Alejandro Hernández (@), editor in Mexican über-magazine Arquine, tweeted this pic of the book before I started writing this. There are 12 more pages like those, which can be found in their original context here and here. That’s Ethel Baraona on the far right, in a precognitive vision of her own presence at the Biennale. 

Russ Meyer would have been proud, Remment.

Violeau, Jean-Louis: REM. Le Bon, la Brute… Paris: Éditions B2. Collection CONTRE-CULTURES, 2014.

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(…) Digging into the dirty laundry of the architectural star-system is, in any case, neither a recent phenomenon nor a curiosity exclusively circumscribed to today’s divas. The mouth-to-ear airing of our architectural heroes’ private sins has been an inevitable aside of their rise as idols. Small talk on the lower passions of the masters of the past has accompanied the writing of the big lines of the History of Modern Architecture, and along with our worshiping of their oeuvre comes the delight to learn about their quaintest interiorities: Mies van der Rohe´s infamous (non) affairs with Ms. Farnsworth, Alvar Aalto´s alcoholism -a recurring topic for Finnish cartoonists3, or Le Corbusier´s pathological Messianic obsessions are personal details that have transcended the boundaries of scientific biographies to become precious pieces of information we love adding to our common knowledge of them. We need both heroes and villains: The formers to inspire us, the latter to offer us some moral relief at the sight of a worse human being than ourselves. But even more, we’d rather having our heroes be our villains too. Some will argue that these minor flaws humanize our icons, making them flesh and blood human beings we can better relate to, and certainly this “fleshing out” helps build our interest on them. But this humanization is also an excuse that sugarcoats a very straight forward preservation mechanism, devised to protect our self-esteem at that point where admiration meets sheer envy. There’s nothing we love more than a rags to riches story -except for a riches to rags story, that is.

A most interesting reversion of this turns up, however, when these minutiae actually become an integral part of the mythos, to the point of being vital contributors to its very construction. Again, the careful devise of its own legend was an inherent feature of architecture’s entrance into modernity, often created as a fiction before it really happened. (…) The fascinating point here is how this emergence of gossiping contributes to the creation of the starchitect; how in the case of contemporary icons such as Rem Koolhaas it´s the unofficial flux of information surrounding the figure which ultimately elevates him into a legendary status.

Of course, in the case of Koolhaas the shaping of this aura is also engineered through conventional means; Koolhaas is a sharp thinker and an eloquent writer and spokesman who has shaken the architectural scene of the last decades with acute reflections of deliberate and controlled ambiguity. But even more than through his words, the Koolhaas mediatic persona has been constructed through a parallel dissemination of details about his behind-the-scenes: stories that tell us of a man who lives in airplanes, sending by mail corrections for a document he was given in a meeting a few hours before, of a Renaissance man who swims every time he lands, or wins a competition with a single, cunning speech5. All this mouth-to-ear stories, propagated through the netsphere, contribute to endow his figure with an halo of epic mystery that propells him into an almost superhuman category. Koolhaas is the über-example of the starchitect, where the personality comes first and the work second. And that’s the bottom line: Koolhaas can produce starchitecture because he is, first and foremost, a star. Le Corbusier´s delightully maudit portrait, painting nude in Saint Tropez has been replaced by a cover of L’Uomo Vogue.

But public notoriety is as easy to gather in the age of software as difficult to retain. The internet era is also the age of the twitterization of knowledge, a time where information both reigns and deflates, where news are as ubiquitous as thoroughly made-to-forget, immediately replaced by new installments. The same could be said about some of the architecture produced by this idiosyncrasy, made to glow for a moment and quickly disappear; architecture of futile monumentality and inevitable ephemerality designed within a discipline obsessed with creating the building of the century… of the week. In this new paradigm, the (st)architect has to become a public figure, an entertainer, a performer, or even, if needed, a celebrity of the Kardashian kind. The World Wide Web and the rapid production allowed by digital tools have multiplied the presence of architecture in everyday life, and have worked together to create a new type of architect sustained above all by his communication skills. The internet, blog culture, Twitter, have leveled the capability of everyone to achieve their share of Warholian fame, but in turn, their allotted fifteen minutes have been drastically reduced to -maybe- fifteen seconds. The attention of the audience, brought up in a solid diet of continuous novelty, is volatile, and the architecture of today has to keep nourishing its audience at a steady pace, or risk disappearing from the picture right away.

And it is in this context where gossip, criticism and satire, emerge as tools for the maintenance of public presence. The internet has also revived the long-loved tradition of the fast gag, the sketchy commentary, and the cartoon, which offer the necessary escape route for the asfixiating ubiquity and self-indulgence of architectural discourse. As any endogamic discipline, architecture has a record of taking itself too seriously, and of alternating victimism and self-deprecation with tremendous arrogance and a myopic lack of perspective (ironic as it is) on the relevance of its own obsessions. The reemergence of satire appears as a natural counterbalance for this, offering us a way to mock our loved-hated idols that’s apparently naive, inoffensive (but with the potential to become really offensive), and sublimate our frustration through ironic laughter, instead of bitter full-frontal (yes) criticism, while at the same time, reinforcing the (com)position of the starchitectural who’s who. As Oscar Wilde, via some of our infamous celebrities, would point out, the ultimate goal is to be talked about so as to be (there), even if just to be thrashed, and architects, with their fragile yet unrestrained egos, become the ideal victim/beneficiary of this revival. Today, gossip refashions itself as a form of viral advertising. The motto is “keep them talking”. (…)

Tell me more! – Gossiping, cartooning, and the nourishing of the  Starchitectural status quo

Conditions magazine #10: Gossip, July 2012

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The above are some excerpts from a (not really much longer) article published in the last issue of Conditions magazine, which I received last month, in the middle of the busiest July I can remember. Conditions is an independent Scandinavian magazine on Architecture and Urbanism edited by Joana da Rocha Sá Lima, Tor Inge Hjemdal, and  Anders Melsom whose next issue, “Possible Greenland”, will be part of the official catalogue of this year’s Danish/Greenlandic contribution to the Venice Biennale. Conditions #10 is dedicated to gossip, and features contributions by Robert Somol, Eduard Sancho, Christian Hjelle, Irene Hwang, Ed Ogosta, Espen Vatn, Freddy Massad&Alicia Guerrero Yeste, Roberto Naboni, Iben Falconer and yours truly. The essay above was written around the same time as Modern Talking, the article published in Mas Context #14: Communication that tackled on some overlapping issues, which explains the recurrent use of some examples and ramblings; either that or I’m entering a wino-in-a-bar dynamics where I just keep repeating the same the same stuff over and over. Please, be forgiving.

If you want to read the full article, click in the images below, or -much better- order a copy here. You can also read the text of Eduard Sancho’s And if most of the job offers are fake? here. Special thanks to Gislunn Halfdanardottir.

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Once upon a time, people compared with their neighbors. Your neighbor was your point of reference and thus the most desirable object of gossip and eavesdropping. Not so anymore. In the world of global networking, you are driven by ambition to compare yourself with the most clever or world-renowned exponents of your trade. Even a critique, satire or parody of the star-system of architecture is an affirmation of its hegemony. Who doesn’t want to be the object of architecture gossip? After all, it’s giving the “stars” more attention, no matter how critical the original intention was. For addicts of gossip, all news is good news, the worst thing is silence, and even a well mediated “scandal” can actually promote your career.
The current issue of CONDITIONS investigates the function of gossip in architecture. Gossip has always been around in architecture as one of the oldest ways of sharing, maneuvering and convincing. But how does it manifest itself today within the instant culture of internet and social media? What is the role of gossip in contemporary networking? Has the logic of gossip and instant gratification also penetrated what we used to call architectural critique?

Kunst-Haas in the streets of Portimão

Last night, at a conference-dialogue at ISMAT, we launched a Photographic Marathon to go along with the Exhibition Klaus.Toon: From NY to Portimão, organised in collaboration with the Delegação do algarve da Ordem dos Arquitectos. The call for submissions will be open till January 10, 2011. The terms are detailed in the announcement below. Thanks from here to Josué Elizario and Hugo Nazareth for their invitation, to Ricardo Camacho, Rui Vargas and Vítor Lourenço, and to the staggeringly crowded -and participative- audience that granted us with their attention for over two hours.

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KLAUS.TOON – PHOTOGRAPHIC MARATHON

The exhibition Klaus.Toon: From New York to Portimão, which will be displayed in Portimão from November 26 to December 26, 2010, has been conceived as a mixture between a traditional gallery-enclosed exhibition and a piece of guerrilla-art, where the cartoons make part of a performance where art and city interact.

Organised in a threefold structure, that starts at the Teatro TEMPO, with another vertex at the Praça da República and a third meeting point in Bar Porta Velha (Travessa Manuel Dias Barão) the aim of the exhibition is to turn the streets of Portimão’s old centre into a gallery space by displaying the rest of the works on the shop windows of different stores located in Rua Direita, Rua Diogo Tomé, Alameda da República and Rua Vasco da Gama.

Following this logics of interaction the Ordem dos Arquitectos – Delegação Algarve launches a photographic marathon where we invite everyone to record the different situations fostered by the presence of the exhibition in the street. We are looking for pictures that depict the funny, weird, surprising or just casual interactions between people and the exhibition, but also pictures of the cartoons themselves, either in isolation or in context, series of pictures, or whatever other ideas the photographers want to show.

The photos will be uploaded on a Klaustoon’s  Flickr account, and a selection of them will be shown in Klaustoon’s Blog. Also, the best photos will be awarded a cartoon of their choice once the exhibition is over.

We want your photos! Please, send them to klaustoons@gmail.com.

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KLAUS.TOON – MARATONA FOTOGRÁFICA

A exposição Klaus.Toon – “De Nova Iorque a Portimão”, que decorre em Portimão de 26 de Novembro a 26 de Dezembro de 2010, foi concebida como um cruzamento entre a tradicional galeria fechada e a peça de “guerrilla-art”, onde os cartoons fazem parte de uma performance de interacção entre a arte e a cidade.

A exposição é organizada em três partes, começa no “Tempo” ( Teatro Municipal de Portimão), tem um vértice na Praça da República e termina num terceiro ponto de encontro no Bar “Porta Velha” (Travessa Manuel Dias Barão). Tem o objectivo de transformar as ruas do centro histórico de Portimão numa galeria aberta ao envolver o resto do trabalho nas montras das várias lojas da Rua Direita, Rua Diogo Tomé, Alameda da República e Rua Vasco da Gama.

Seguindo esta lógica de interacção, a Ordem dos Arquitectos – Delegação do Algarve e a Casa Gran Turismo – Silves, promovem uma maratona de fotografia que convida todos os interessados a participarem e a recolherem fotográficamente várias interpretações ou situações, que a presença da exposição nas ruas possa proporcionar. Procuram-se imagens que possam suscitar o alegre, o esquisito, a surpresa ou simplesmente a interacção casual entre as pessoas e a exposição, imagens dos próprios cartoons isoladamente ou num determinado contexto, séries de imagens ou qualquer outro tipo de ideias que os fotógrafos queiram transmitir.

As fotografias serão publicadas na internet, na conta Klaustoon Flickr e as seleccionadas divulgadas no Klaustoon’s Blog. Será ainda atribuído às melhores fotografias um cartoon a cada, escolhido pelos premiados. Os trabalhos deverão ser enviados até dia 10 de Janeiro de 2011 em formato jpeg 800×600 (72dpi).

Precisamos das suas fotografias! Por favor, enviar para klaustoons@gmail.com.

Cartoon Location Plan (Design by Filipa Cabrita)

You can also download the flyer of the exhibition with the cartoon guide here.

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