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Exhibitions

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Click to enlarge. Photographs (c) Sissi Roselli

From June 10 to July 3, 2016, the Ca’ Pesaro Museum of Moder Art in Venice will be holding the exhibition Drawn Theories / Teorie disegnate. The exhibition, curated by Sara Marini and Giovanni Corbellini, and organized within the international research project Recycle Italy collects an international landscape of authors who express their positions about recycling in architecture through drawing’. Among some nice graphic installments by more apt professionals, it also features a sequence of drawings by yours truly, which show the shameless recycling of a drawing that was itself using elements from a previous commission. Seeing the whole ensemble, which includes works from some usual suspects such as Jimenez Lai or Wes Jones, I wonder whether I should have produced a piece exclusively for the show, but timing forbade.

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Jimenez Lai: ‘Wrong’, via 

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That guy. Photographs (c) Sissi Roselli

The inauguration took place be on June 10 at 4 pm at Ca’ Pesaro, ground floor, in the rooms for the small temporary exhibitions. However, if you won’t be able to attend it while in the gallery, the exhibition will later  be set up at Tolentini for the PRIN Re-cycle Italy final conference on September 30, 2016).

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The authors featured are: Eduardo Arroyo, Aldo Aymonino, Carmelo Baglivo, Piotr Barbarewicz, Baukuh, Rosario Giovanni Brandolino, Pablo Castro (OBRA Architects), Fabio Alessandro Fusco, Wes Jones, Jimenez Lai, David Mangin, Luca Merlini, Riccardo Miotto, Hrvoje Njiric, Peanutz Architekten, Matteo Pericoli, Franco Purini, François Roche, Beniamino Servino, Federico Soriano, Tam Associati + Marta Gerardi, Klaus (Klaustoon), and Yellow Office.This exhibitions is organized within the international research Recycle Italy. It concerns the potential of  conceptual processing connected to drawing and its capability to observe reality, catching latent design-related points of view.

Re/Cycle Research group: Pippo Ciorra, Francesco Garofalo, Sara Marini, Giovanni Corbellini, Alberto Bertagna, Giulia Menzietti, Francesca Pignatelli.

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Click to enlarge. Copyright David Schalliol

So, after last year’s relative silence, 2015 is featuring an also relative back to business in terms of exhibition-related events, with a couple of cameos in bigger exhibitions, and maybe something else a little later. -Of course, all of them happen because there are extremely kind people out there who decide to take the time and effort necessary to put these things together. If it depended on me, then it would have been total silence all these years.

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The first of these events is taking place within the Chatter: Architecture Talks Back exhibition at the Art Institute of Chicago. Curated by Karen Kice, the exhibition states that ‘Architecture is a perpetual conversation between the present and the past, knowing full well that the future is listening. So what happens when this dialogue is influenced by contemporary modes of communication such as texting, Twitter, and Instagram? Chatter happens: ideas are developed, produced, and presented as open-ended or fragmented conversations and cohere through the aggregation of materials. Chatter:’ Thus, Architecture Talks Back ‘looks at the diverse contemporary methods and approaches wielded by five emerging architects: Bureau Spectacular, Erin Besler, Fake Industries Architectural Agonism, Formlessfinder, and John Szot Studio.

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copyright Mas Context

Within this main exhibition, the rear gallery features an installation by Iker Gil, director –and longtime partner in crime– of Mas Context, journal ‘, which offers visitors a chance to explore the multitude of ways in which architecture can be communicated.’ Iker ‘conceived this section [as a way] to look at the active qualities of chatter-from being constant to satirical-to spark conversations about the field of architecture, our cities, and their citizens.

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copyright David Schalliol

Walking this section you will meet projects by Ecosistema Urbano; Over, Under and Pinkcomma; Mimi Zeiger and Neil Donnelly with the School of Visual Arts Summer Design Writing and Research Intensive; “Project_” with Sarah Hirschman; 300.000km/s with Àrea Metropolitana de Barcelona; Luis Urculo; and Christopher Baker, and a selection of cartoons by yours truly. All the works are exhibited under a series of labels: ‘Challenging’, ‘Collective’, ‘Diagnostic’, ‘Empowering’, ‘Interpretive’, ‘Constant’, ‘Revealing’, and -inevitably- ‘Satirical’.

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Along with the exhibition, several events have been organized within this space: Chatter Chat: Talking Back (April 11, 2015), a roundtable discussion moderated by Kelly Bair, Director, Central Standard Office of Design, Chatter Chat: Communication (May 16, 2015), moderated by Iker Gil, and a tour through the exhibition (Tuesday, June 16, 2015) led by Iker Gil and Karen Kice.

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For more information about the exhibition, please visit the official website, MAS Context’s page, or the different reviews on the show that can be found online. For past exhibits on this very blog, click hereAs usual, a big thank you to Iker and the chief curator.

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copyright Simone Florena

One of the highlights of 2013 -which has certainly been the busiest year in terms of Klaus-related events so far- was the unexpected invitation to participate in the 2013 Comicon in Naples, in late April. created in 1998, the Naples Comicon has evolved from a rather domestic celebration of comics culture into an event of Biblical proportions with concerts, hundreds of vendors, exhibitions, international artists, and hundreds of thousands of accumulated visitors (60,000 only in the 2013 event).

Since its third edition, in 2001, the Comicon also displayed a central theme that ran through the exhibitions, conferences  and guest artists. First, it dealt with comic book culture as developed in/by certain countries (the 2001 edition focused on Spain and Latin America). In 2007, the central theme changed to the more abstract field of color (starting with cyan, and ending with black in 2010), and in 2011 it moved towards the interactions between comics and the higher arts: Music (2011), Literature (2012), and, after being delayed for a couple of years, Architecture in 2013 (the 2014 Comicon will be focused on comics and cinema). Within this context, it’s difficult to start to explain how excited I was when Andrea Alberghini (author of the book Sequenze Urbane: la Metropoli nell Fumetto), who worked as a consultant in architectural-related issues for the organization, contacted me asking if I wanted to participate.

Other than giving me the chance to finally visit Pompei, the Comicon also presented the rather surreal opportunity to be sitting in a panel, “Building Comics”, along with two living legends I often write about, such as Joost Swarte and François Schuiten. The fact that both of them had a great role in shaping my interests in architecture just adds to the ‘over-the-top-ness’ of the experience.  Adding to this, a second panel, “Fumett(archi)tettando”, gave me the opportunity to rejoin Swarte, and meet architect-comic book artist Manuele Fior. The effects of all this can be seen in the special issue MAS Context: Narrative I was coediting at the time, which was already in the works, but certainly took a new turn after this (check the interview Swarte’s Mystery Theater’, ‘Images Come First’, a conversation between Andrea Alberghini and Manuele Fior, or Melanie Van der Hoorn’sSensing the Comics’ DNA: A Conversation with François Schuiten’).

01The Klaus Korner. Photograph by Cristina Cusani via Comics metropolis.

02_Building_Comics_IntroThe Klaus Korner. Photograph by Cristina Cusani via Comics metropolis.

02_Building_Comics_IntroSome of the works exhibited in the ‘Building Comics’ area. Photograph by Cristina Cusani via Comics metropolis.

Also, I have to thank Alino, Claudio Curcio and the rest of the organization for building an area dedicated to my work within the big exhibition “Building Comics”, where I was in the company of original artwork by Winsor McCay, François Schuiten, Joost Swarte, George McManus, Chris Ware, or George Herrimann. An experience both flattering and embarrassing. Thanks!

More info on the Naples Comicon, both past and present, on their website (in Italian).

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MAS_Context_Analog_2012_Iker_Gil_04Photograph by Matthew Messner

The lapse from 2012 to 2013 and the months that followed have been a particularly busy period, both regarding my work as Klaus and my scholarly life, so almost a year has gone by without my posting a single word about the ARCHITECTURAL NARRATIVES Exhibition in the MAS Context: analog event in Chicago, last October.

Following an urge to give credit to all those people who insist in organizing those things for me (since none of this would happen if we had to wait for myself to take the initiative), I would like to thank Iker Gil, from MAS Studio, for insisting in putting this together. As in previous occasions, MAS Context: Analog was organized as a one-day event gathering emerging and established practitioners within the field of design who discussed their work. This time, the event included presentations by Sean Lally, David Brown, David Rueter, John Pobojewski, Sara C. Aye & George Aye, and many more. The event took place in Saturday, October 13 2012, and it was housed by NEW PROJECTS, an urban design studio, research center, and exhibition space in Chicago directed by Marshall Brown and Stephanie Smith located at 3621 South State Street in Chicago.

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This time the event also opened the exhibition “Architectural Narratives”, which was available for viewing for the whole next month, and featured a number of works by Jimenez Lai and yours truly. The original plan had been to entitle the exhibition “Building Stories”, after Chris Ware’s eponymous magna opus, but, as it happened, Mr Ware himself was having his own exhibition entitled that way in the Adam Baumgold Gallery and Carl Hammer Gallery (Chicago) in those very days (serendipity). Still, the exhibition looked really nice, and worked as the basis for a bigger (and exhausting) collaboration with MAS Context that will show its results before the end of the year.

Scroll down for some images of the event or go to the entry on the event at  MAS Context’s website.

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Photographs by Iker Gil

On Tuesday, July 24, I will be opening a small exhibition at the Architecture Foundation in London. The exhibit will be housed as an installation within an exhibition in the context of Jimenez Lai’s super-furnitured Three Little Worlds, currently at display at the AF. Klaus Toons, which will feature a few cartoons blown up to poster size, will be on display till August 18 (but there’s a trick to that). I’m really thrilled by the fact that for the launching event, I’ll have Tomorrow’s Thoughts Today’s Liam Young on my side joining for a conversational presentation, which will hopefully help me overcome my natural inarticulateness and add a note of quality to the event. A big thank you to the people at the AF (with a special acknowledgement to Justin Jaeckle) for their interest, and to Jimenez, for getting it started. I hope he already recovered from sleeping on my couch.

The pic on top should be a cartoon that waits somewhere on my computer to be finished. More on that later. (And of course, for our Italian readers…)

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Last week, during the Alumni Weekend at the Harvard Graduate School of Design, the exhibition “Dispatches from the GSD: 075 Years of Design” was officially inaugurated. In the GSD Website you can find all the information regarding the events that took place. For some more info and a few pics (including the stand where some of the cartoons from this blog are exhibited) you can scroll down or just click here.

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Some of the events were streamed live, and in youtube you can find videos of the reception toast by Harvard President Drew Faust, and of the looong Faculty & Student Pecha Kucha that took place as part of the 75th anniversary celebration. There’s also a short but nicely illustrated commentary on Harvard Magazine, and a brief at Peter Christensen’s site.

Dispatches from the GSD Exhibition – Main Wall.

The 2011-12 academic year marks the 75th anniversary of the founding of the Harvard Graduate School of Design, and in order to celebrate it, the GSD will host a number of events regarding the anniversary throughout the whole academic year. Along with those, the GSD is hosting the exhibit “Dispatches from the GSD: 075 Years of Design”, which will be on display for the duration of the Fall semester throughout Gund Hall, including installations in the lobby gallery, Loeb Library and fourth floor.

Instead of showing a chronological approach that would be inevitably incomplete, the exhibition, which was assembled by a team of students, professors, alumni and staff, has been divided into a succession of episodes; moments that Peter Christensen, curatorial director, describes as “journalistic dispatches from the past, each with its own narrative and artifacts”. All these fictional journalistic dispatches, whose texts have been written accordingly, have been arranged within six thematic categories: Design as Research, Design as Critique, City as Process, City as Form, The Continuous Institution, and The Shifting Institution. 

General view of the exhibition in Gund Hall’s lobby

Shown in this last area, The Shifting Institution, item [C02.21: A Comic Take on the Harvard Graduate School of Design] consists of several comic drawings, including some cartoons from “Klaus on the GSD” done in 2009 [I am sincerely flattered]. Here are a couple of pics and the accompanying text:

A Comic Take On the Harvard Graduate School of Design. July 25, 2009.

CAMBRIDGE, MA – If you want to know what happens between the walls of Harvard Graduate School of Design, the comic strip Klaustoons will give you the answer. Written by an Alumnus of the school hiding behind the pseudonym of “Klaus,” the blog offers humorous cartoons that capture moments of academic life, general student culture and critical discussions in architecture. Cartoons aren’t new at the Graduate School of Design, where the students’ drawing abilities have been known to serve satirical purposes since the 1980s.

The cartoons displayed are Changes in the GSD (Hairstyles I), Platform 2008, GSD Lectures 2008: Parametric Design (I), GSD Lectures 2008: Parametric Performances, Bruno Latour and Peter Sloterdijk: Networks and Spheres, On Starchitecture, and Koolhaas at Harvard: Ecological Urbanism. In the same display there are three more cartoons provided by the Special Collections Department of the Loeb Library: one by Fran Hosken (c1940s), and two more signed by Wang, from the 70s-80s (Inés Zalduendo dixit)

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Dispatches from the GSD: 075 years of design
August 22–December 22, 2011

Anniversaries offer the opportunity to consider the past as an active interlocutor with the present and the future. For the GSD, this means foregrounding an array of agents—people, events, objects, and ideas—in a rich institutional history to bring the collective memory of seventy-five years into sharper focus for design practice today and tomorrow. Conjuring a comprehensive account of the institution since 1936—its thousands of alumni, hundreds of faculty and staff, and two homes—would run the risk of homogenizing a history characterized so consistently by heterogeneity and multiplicity.

As such, the exhibition employs an approach that is episodic, reveling in moments of the GSD’s history that are as singular as they are important. In the spirit of framing these moments as stories unto themselves, they have been conceived of as journalistic dispatches from the past, each with its own narrative and artifacts. Writing history in the present tense, as this exhibition does, is an attempt to make the GSD’s vitality clear and to claim a future that is at once inherited and projective.

The 120 dispatches in this exhibition begin in 1936 and arrive at the present day to include a handful of contemporary thought pieces from a cross section of the School’s faculty, each expressing in a single authorial voice a reflection on the state of design today and the challenges of its future. The historical dispatches are organized into six thematic categories: Design as Research, Design as Critique, City as Process, City as Form, The Continuous Institution, and The Shifting Institution. Each section contains dispatches that speak to a greater set of themes spanning all of the School’s programs and departments, various media, and all seventy-five of the School’s years. In momentarily stopping the clock, this exhibition hopes to enliven the GSD, and Harvard University at large, with the engagement and propulsion that the past can offer us today and tomorrow.

—Peter Christensen (PhD ’14), Curatorial Director

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Below these lines you can find some general photos of the exhibition. Make sure to check the GSD website for more pics and updates on the exhibition and events. Also, Bruce Mau Design offer a couple of peeks at the  posters they designed for the event (updated here).

Special thanks to Inés Zalduendo and Mary Daniels (Curatorial Advisors of the exhibition and masters of the Dark), Marta Fenollosa and Igor Ekstajn (all additional photographs by Igor Ekstajn)

 

 

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